Part IX: Gene Smith and TBRC

Part IX: Gene Smith and TBRC

When E. Gene Smith was asked how he managed to single-handedly gather together a tremendous amount of the Tibetan literature that had been dispersed during and after the events of 1959, he replied simply, “Karma, I guess.” It’s not that Gene is at a loss for words–he...
Part III: Sudatta Anathapindika

Part III: Sudatta Anathapindika

During the lifetime of the Buddha Shakyamuni, almsgiving was a common practice but there was one patron who stood out from the rest. Through his selflessness and generosity, Sudatta, a successful Brahmin merchant, came to be known as Anathapindika, the incomparable...
Part XII: Emperor Wu of Liang

Part XII: Emperor Wu of Liang

China has a long and glorious connection with Buddhism. It is the country where Ch’an (Zen) took root and where much of the now world-renowned Buddhist-inspired art and culture flourished and grew. There are accounts of the teachings reaching the country as early as...
Part XIV: Her Majesty Ashi Phuntsho Choden Wangchuck

Part XIV: Her Majesty Ashi Phuntsho Choden Wangchuck

“The Bhutanese royal family is known for having a strong tradition of patronage and support for the dharma, especially the queens. In particular, Her Royal Highnesses Ashi Wangmo and Ashi Phuntsho Choden and the present Royal Grandmother Ashi Kesang Choden have...
Part X: Khenpo Kunga Wangchuk

Part X: Khenpo Kunga Wangchuk

In Tibet, the monastic shedras (Buddhist Universities) maintain the authenticity and heritage of the Buddha’s teachings. One such university is Dzongsar Institute, in Derge, Eastern Tibet, founded by Rime master Jamyang Khyentse Wangpo in 1871. It quickly became a...